Attracting Finance For Your Business! 6 Ways to Finance Your Business

Written by Inc.

Finding financing in any economic climate can be challenging, whether you’re looking for start-up funds, capital to expand or money to hold on through the tough times. But given our current state of affairs, securing funds is as tough as ever. To help you find the money you need, we’ve compiled a guide on some financing techniques and what you should know when pursuing them.

1. Consider Factoring

Factoring is a finance method where a company sells its receivables at a discount to get cash up-front. It’s often used by companies with poor credit or by businesses such as apparel manufacturers, which have to fill orders long before they get paid. However, it’s an expensive way to raise funds. Companies selling receivables generally pay a fee that’s a percentage of the total amount. If you pay a 2 percent fee to get funds 30 days in advance, it’s equivalent to an annual interest rate of about 24 percent. For that reason, the business has gotten a bad reputation over the years. That said, the economic downturn has forced companies to look to alternative financing methods and companies like The Receivables Exchange are trying to make factoring more competitive. The exchange allows companies to offer their receivables to dozens of factoring companies at once, along with hedge funds, banks, and other finance companies. These lenders will bid on the invoices, which can be sold in a bundle or one at a time.

2. Get a Bank Loan

Lending standards have gotten much stricter, but banks such as J.P. Morgan Chase and Bank of America have earmarked additional funds for small business lending. So why not apply?

3. Tap into Your 401(k)

If you’re unemployed and thinking about starting your own business, those funds you’ve accumulated in your 401(k) over the years can look pretty tempting. And thanks to provisions in the tax code, you actually can tap into them without penalty if you follow the right steps. The steps are simple enough, but legally complex, so you’ll need someone with experience setting up a C corporation and the appropriate retirement plan to roll your retirement assets into. Remember that you’re investing your retirement funds, which means if things don’t pan out, not only do you lose your business, but your nest egg, too.

4. Try Crowdfunding

A crowdfunding site like Kickstarter.com can be a fun and effective way to raise money for a relatively low cost, creative project. You’ll set a goal for how money you’d like to raise over a period of time, say, $1,500 over 40 days. Your friends, family, and strangers then use the site to pledge money. Kickstarter has funded roughly 1,000 projects, from rock albums to documentary films since its launch last year. But keep in mind, this isn’t about long-term funding. Rather, it’s supposed to facilitate the asking for and giving of support for single, one-off ideas. Usually, project-creators offer incentives for pledging, such as if you give a writer $15, you’ll get a book in return. There’s no long-term return on investment for supporters and not even the ability to write off donations for tax purposes. Still, that hasn’t stopped close to 100,000 people from pledging to Kickstarter projects.

5. Attract an Angel Investor

When pitching an angel investor, all the old rules still apply: be succinct, avoid jargon, have an exit strategy. But the economic turmoil of the last few years has made a complicated game even trickier.

 6. Raise Money from Your Family and Friends

Hitting up family and friends is the most common way to finance a start-up. But when you turn loved ones into creditors, you’re risking their financial future and jeopardizing important personal relationships. A classic mistake is approaching friends and family before a formal business plan is even in place. To avoid it, you should supply formal financial projections, as well as an evidence-based assessment of when your loved ones will see their money again. This should reduce the likelihood of unpleasant surprises. It also lets your investors know you take their money seriously. You also need to seriously consider how the arrangement will be structured. Are you offering equity? Or will this be a loan? Perhaps most importantly, you need to emphasize the risk involved. Offer up a strong business plan, but remind them there is a good chance their money will be lost. It’s better to mention that upfront to Aunt Gladys rather than over Thanksgiving dinner.

For more financial techniques click here to #REGISTER for #LEAPAfricaCEOsForum2016 holding at Landmark Event Centre, Water Corporation, Lagos at 9:00 am on June, 2, 2016

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In this year’s edition of the CEOs Forum, LEAP is taking an orientation and training approach by offering an intensive workshop for participants who would like to explore beyond the general sub-themes discussed at the CEOs forum. 

The workshop is targeted at Chief Executive Officers or Founder/CEOs with businesses in their growth phase. Led by industry experts and successful entrepreneurs, the workshop facilitators will break down and examine a range of investment, finance options and other sources of finance within the different sectors including Agriculture, Technology and Real Estate.

Fees per attendees =N=100, 000. 50% Early bird discounts Offer lasts till May 18, 2016.

To book a seat, contact Ahmed Alaga at aalaga@leapafrica.org or call 012706542 
(Limited seats available)

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1 Comment

  1. Depending on the product, you can also ask for deposit in advance. The big names like Apple, Samsung are good are preselling products, even before launching. Small business like fashion shops also ask for advance before accepting job. So you too can ask your customers to either pay in full or part. This will support your working capital need.

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